Governance

Public health governance is defined as the actions of governments and other actors to steer communities, whole countries or even groups of countries in the pursuit of health as integral to well-being through both whole-of-government and whole-of-society approaches.

Public health governance includes the following sub components:

  • Public health legislation
  • Policy
  • Strategy
  • Funding
  • Organisation
  • Quality assurance (transparency, accountability and audit)

The diagram below illustrates the relationship between each sub-component as reflected in the model below. Each is then expanded further down the page.

Governance

Public health legislation:

  • Public health law, including designation of public health functions, roles and responsibilities, as well as cross-cutting legislation and legislation for specific topics such as tobacco and alcohol control, salt reduction or food fortification.
  • International, national, regional and local leadership roles.
  • IHRs and human rights agreements.
  • Regulations for environmental health and work, and for NCDs.
  • Public accountability and enforcement of legislation, including policing, and reporting systems.

Policy:

  • Senior cross-governmental ministerial public health committee and working groups and health advisors to embed public health across policy.
  • Health diplomacy and foreign policy for health security and to benefit health.
  • Development of cross-sector policy that benefits health (health in all policies).
  • Development of health policy for public health.
  • Cross-sector Health Impact Assessments.

Strategy:

  • Whole-of-society approaches.
  • Skills for strategy development, including:
  • Stakeholder engagement.
  • Public health information and health needs assessment with priority setting, using evidence-based and cost-effective interventions.
  • Service delivery and monitoring of outcomes.

Financing:

  • Appropriate funding sources assigned to public health functions.
  • Sustainable financing systems that protect public health services.
  • Raising funds, pooling and channelling resources, and incentives to maximise efficiency, effectiveness and equity.

Organisation:

  • Clarification of roles, responsibilities, outcomes and accountability of organisations delivering public health functions.
  • Sufficient capacity to deliver services, functions and operations.

Quality assurance: transparency, accountability and audit

  • Transparent and accountable processes in place to improve outcomes and monitor processes to ensure effective, efficient, equitable, accessible, acceptable, safe and sustainable services.
  • Audits undertaken for quality improvement.
  • Quality assurance: transparency, accountability and audit
  • Transparent and accountable processes in place to improve outcomes and monitor processes to ensure effective, efficient, equitable, accessible, acceptable, safe and sustainable services.
  • Audits undertaken for quality improvement.

 

To go back to the systems framework for healthy policy, please click here…. Systems framework